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In 1913 The Los Angeles Department of Water & Power diverted the Owens River to provide drinking water for the rapidly growing metropolis. Ten years later the Owens Lake had completely evaporated, along with any hope for agriculture or development in the region. Massive storms of alkaline dust whipped off the dry lake bed. For over a decade and at a cost of more than $1 billion, LA Department of Water & Power constructed dust control infrastructure to comply with a 1997 court ruling (pictured). August 4, 2009.

In 2017, Inyo County sued LADWP for eminent domain on valley lands purchased over 100 years ago by undercover agents from the thirsty city.

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20090804 139 PS.jpg
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Nathan Weyland
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In 1913 The Los Angeles Department of Water & Power diverted the Owens River to provide drinking water for the rapidly growing metropolis. Ten years later the Owens Lake had completely evaporated, along with any hope for agriculture or development in the region. Massive storms of alkaline dust whipped off the dry lake bed. For over a decade and at a cost of more than $1 billion, LA Department of Water & Power constructed dust control infrastructure to comply with a 1997 court ruling (pictured). August 4, 2009.<br />
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In 2017, Inyo County sued LADWP for eminent domain on valley lands purchased over 100 years ago by undercover agents from the thirsty city.